Calls for European Court of Human Rights to Have Less Power in UK

A senior judge this week (March 26th) suggested that the UK should be provided with essentially a “cooling-off” period, before it is required to accept laws outlined by the European Court of Human Rights.

The judge, who has previously sat as a judge within the court in Strasbourg, has suggested that all new laws set by the European Court of Human Rights should be provided only through a “provisional judgement”.

According to the judge, by providing the new laws as a “provisional judgement” would enable countries, including the UK, to have a cooling off period in which to highlight mistakes and misunderstandings within the new rules; before they are passed into national law.

The judge has suggested that the cooling-off period should be a three year period; and had this previously been in place, certain rules introduced into the UK law would have been passed back to the European Court of Human Rights.

Meanwhile, the Justice Secretary has suggested that senior judges support him in regards to human right laws, and the European Court of Human Rights currently having too much influence on UK law.

Whilst the senior judge has suggested that the UK should be provided a cooling-off period before implementing new laws set out by the European Court of Human Rights, and the Justice Secretary suggesting the court should have less power in the UK, for those facing legal proceedings relating to human rights, our team of solicitors can assist.

At Howe+Co, we have a large and dedicated team of human right solicitors, who have extensive knowledge and expertise within a range of human right legal matters; including Article 2 of the ECHR, rights of association, assembly and free speech and Article 6 of the ECHR.

To find out how our human rights solicitors in London can assist you, contact us today.

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